Self-Driving Family Trip To The West triptoto
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  • Union Square (San Francisco)

    Union Square is a 2.6-acre public plaza bordered by Geary, Powell, Post and Stockton Streets in downtown San Francisco, California. "Union Square" also refers to the central shopping, hotel, and theater district that surrounds the plaza for several blocks. The area got its name because it was once used for rallies and support for the Union Army during the American Civil War,earning its designation as a California Historical Landmark.Today, this one-block plaza and surrounding area is one of the largest collections of department stores, upscale boutiques, gift shops, art galleries, and beauty salons in the United States, making Union Square a major tourist destination, a vital, cosmopolitan gathering place in downtown San Francisco, and one of the world's premier shopping districts.Grand hotels and small inns, as well as repertory, off-Broadway, and single-act theaters also contribute to the area's dynamic, 24-hour character.

  • The Cheesecake Factory

    American chain restaurant offering sizable portions from a vast menu including signature cheesecake.

  • Powell/Mason Cable Car Turnaround

    The San Francisco cable car system is the world's last manually operated cable car system. An icon of San Francisco, the cable car system forms part of the intermodal urban transport network operated by the San Francisco Municipal Railway. Of the twenty-three lines established between 1873 and 1890,three remain (one of which combines parts of two earlier lines): two routes from downtown near Union Square to Fisherman's Wharf, and a third route along California Street. While the cable cars are used to a certain extent by commuters, the vast majority of their 7 million annual passengers are tourists.They are among the most significant tourist attractions in the city, along with Alcatraz Island, the Golden Gate Bridge, and Fisherman's Wharf. The cable cars are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    Simply a must do SF attraction, though a little pricy ($7) if you're paying per trip, perhaps look into an unlimited pass.

  • Lombard Street

  • Fisherman's Wharf

  • Pier 39

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Best Western Carmel's Town House Lodge
Cost: 188 USD    Number of rooms: 1
  • Fort Point

    Fort Point from the Civil War era located under the Golden Gate Bridge offering cannon drills & tours.

  • Golden Gate Bridge

  • Stanford University

    Visit our historic Main Quad with its distinct Richardsonian Romanesque and California Mission Revival architecture or see our new Science and Engineering Quad, which beautifully incorporates modern and technological elements with timeless, elegant aesthetics and an abundance of outdoor space.

    • Pick up a self-guided tour map and walk around campus at your leisure, or take a one-hour, student-led Campus Walking Tour at 11am or 3:15pm.
    • See a panoramic view of the area from the Hoover Tower observation platform, 285 feet above Stanford’s campus.
    • Enjoy a meal at one of our many campus eateries or dining halls.
    • Stop in at the Herbert Hoover Memorial Exhibit Pavilion.
  • 17 Mile Dr Bay Skyline

    America's famous high-end luxury mansion district in 17 Miles Drive along the line, so we can imagine how beautiful the scenery here! Because expensive villas, beautiful scenery, has become the focus of a tour in California, the car was moved into this segment route charges, pedestrians and bicycles free of charge.

    Primary scenic attractions include Cypress Point, Bird Rock, Point Joe, Pescadero Point, Fanshell Beach & Seal Point. The famous "Witch Tree" landmark, often used as scenic background in movies and television, was formerly at Pescadero Point. The tree was blown down by a storm on January 14, 1964. Pescadero Point is also the site of the Ghost Tree, a landmark Monterey Cypress tree. The tree gives its name to a dangerous extreme surfing location known to have storm waves.Currently, the surf break of Ghost Tree is off limits to surfers and watercraft.

  • Carmel-by-the-Sea

    Carmel-by-the-Sea, often simply referred to as Carmel, is a city in Monterey County, California, United States, founded in 1902 and incorporated on October 31, 1916. Situated on the Monterey Peninsula, Carmel is known for its natural scenery and rich artistic history. In 1906, the San Francisco Call devoted a full page to the "artists, writers and poets at Carmel-by-the-Sea",and in 1910 it reported that 60 percent of Carmel's houses were built by citizens who were "devoting their lives to work connected to the aesthetic arts." Early City Councils were dominated by artists, and the city has had several mayors who were poets or actors, including Herbert Heron, founder of the Forest Theater, bohemian writer and actor Perry Newberry, and actor-director Clint Eastwood.

    The city is known for being dog-friendly, with numerous hotels, restaurants and retail establishments admitting guests with dogs. Carmel is also known for several unusual laws, including a prohibition on wearing high-heel shoes without a permit, enacted to prevent lawsuits arising from tripping accidents caused by irregular pavement.

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Venice Suites
Cost: 275 USD    Number of rooms: 1
  • Hearst Castle

    San Simeon is a town and census-designated place on the Pacific coast of San Luis Obispo County, California. Its position along State Route 1 is approximately halfway between Los Angeles and San Francisco, each of those cities being roughly 230 miles away. A key feature of the area is Hearst Castle, a hilltop mansion built by William Randolph Hearst in the early 20th century that is now a tourist attraction. 

  • Piedras Blancas Elephant Seal Rookery

    The Piedras Blancas elephant seal rookery spreads over 6 miles of shoreline around Point Piedras Blancas on the central coast of California. The viewing areas are located 90 miles south of Monterey, 5 miles north of Hearst Castle State Historical Monument in San Simeon, 1.5 miles south of Point Piedras Blancas. The viewing areas are open every day of the year, are wheelchair accessible, and free. No reservations required.

  • Big Sur

    Big Sur, described in 1912 as the "greatest meeting of land and water in the world,"is a undeveloped, lightly populated, unincorporated region on California's Central Coast where the Santa Lucia Mountains rise abruptly from the Pacific Ocean. The coast is frequently praised for its rugged coastline and mountain views. As the "longest and most scenic stretch of undeveloped coastline in the continental United States,"it has been described it as a "national treasure that demands extraordinary procedures to protect it from development,"and "one of the most beautiful coastlines anywhere in the world, an isolated stretch of road, mythic in reputation."Big Sur's Cone Peak at 5,155 feet (1,571 m) is only 3 miles (5 km) from the ocean.The stunning views make Big Sur a popular tourist destination.

  • Solvang

    Solvang was founded in 1911 on almost 9,000 acres of the Rancho San Carlos de Jonata Mexican land grant, by a group of Danes who traveled west to establish a Danish colony far from the midwestern winters. The city is home to a number of bakeries, restaurants, and merchants offering a taste of Denmark in California. The architecture of many of the façades and buildings reflects traditional Danish style. There is a copy of the famous Little Mermaid statue from Copenhagen, as well as one featuring the bust of famed Danish fable writer Hans Christian Andersen. A replica of Copenhagen's Round Tower or Rundetårn in the scale 1:3 was finished in 1991 and can be seen in the town center.

  • Stearns Wharf

    Stearns Wharf is a pier in the harbor in Santa Barbara, California, United States. When completed In 1872, it became the longest deep-water pier between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

    Storied wooden wharf offering restaurants, varied shops, a small aquarium & water views.

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Paris Las Vegas
Cost: 89 USD    Number of rooms: 1
  • Venice Beach

  • Santa Monica State Beach

    The first beach you'll hit after the Santa Monica Freeway (I–10) runs into the Pacific Coast Highway, wide and sandy Santa Monica is the place for sunning and socializing. Be prepared for a mob scene on summer weekends, when parking becomes an expensive ordeal. Swimming is fine (with the usual post-storm pollution caveat); for surfing, go elsewhere. For a memorable view, climb up the stairway over the PCH to Palisades Park, at the top of the bluffs. Free summer-evening concerts are held on the pier on Thursday nights. Amenities: food and drink; lifeguards; parking; showers; toilets; water sports. Best for: sunset; surfing; swimming; walking.

  • Las Vegas Strip

    The Las Vegas Strip is a stretch of Las Vegas Boulevard South in Clark County, internationally known for its concentration of resort hotels and casinos along its route. The Strip is approximately 4.2 miles in length,located immediately south of the Las Vegas city limits in the unincorporated towns of Paradise and Winchester. However, the Strip is often referred to as being "in Las Vegas". Most of the Strip has been designated an All-American Road, and is considered a scenic route at night. Many of the largest hotel, casino, and resort properties in the world are located on the Las Vegas Strip. Fifteen of the world's 25 largest hotels by room count are on the Strip, with a total of over 62,000 rooms.

    One of the most visible aspects of Las Vegas' cityscape is its use of dramatic architecture and lights. The rapidly evolving skyline and constant modernization of hotels, casinos, restaurants, residential high-rises, and entertainment offerings on the Strip, have established it as one of the most popular destinations for tourists in the United States, and the world.

     

  • Fountains of Bellagio

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  • Las Vegas North Premium Outlets

    Large mall with 150 shops of designer & household brands in clothing, accessories, leather & gifts. 

  • Fremont Street Experience

  • Outdoor Gondola Rides

    By the Gondola of the Venetian hotel,Passengers will feel as if they have really been shipped to Italy.The Gondola imitating the Venice's, has four seats each pod, take four people.It also has a white and gold elaborative wedding pod, served as many wedding.

    Take the escalator located in the clock tower outside of the Venice hotel to the second floor, enter the hall,the first is shopping area, through the shopping area to the end of the canal.The Gondola Wharf just on the other end of the canal.

  • The Roller Coaster

    The Roller Coaster, through the inside and outside of the hotel.The peak of The Roller Coaster is 203m high, the biggest dive is 144m,with the speed of 108 km per hour.
    The Roller Coaster was launched in January 1997, more than one million visitors experience each year.

  • Volcano at The Mirage

    An artificial volcano along the Strip that "erupts" nightly at 7PM and 8PM, plus 9PM on Friday and Saturday. After sister property Bellagio opened, the design firm WET Enterprises improved the technology behind the volcano effect to make it more spectacular in 1996. To avoid the smell of uncombusted natural gas odorant, the mercaptan is stripped from the natural gas and a pina colada fragrance is added to the natural gas stream. A new soundtrack, complete with the sounds of actual volcanoes erupting, and featuring the work of Grateful Dead drummer Mickey Hart,has been included for an even more enhanced experience.

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  • Hoover Dam

    will stay there for half an hour.
  • Powerhouse Visitors Centre

    Museum with exhibits detailing the historical transformation of the famous Americana icon, Route 66.

  • South Rim Trail

  • Grand Canyon Visitor Center

    If you are entering through the South Entrance Station, make the Visitor Center your first stop. You can park your car in one of four parking areas, then get your first view of Grand Canyon by taking a short walk (or shuttle bus ride) to nearby Mather Point.

    From the Visitor Center, it is also possible to Park-and-Ride. Leave your car and board free shuttle buses to ride around the Village and out to scenic overlooks.

    At the Visitor Center you can:

    • Find information. Outside exhibits discuss park activities and attractions; hiking, the free shuttle bus system and park ranger programs.
    • Watch Grand Canyon: A Journey of Wonder, a 20 minute movie that takes viewers on a rim to river and dawn to dusk journey through the park. Movie starts on the hour and half-hour
    • Explore exhibits inside, including: interactive trip planners, a large video-enabled relief map, a Science On a Sphere® program, and displays of historic artifacts.
    • Stop at the Park Store for books and a variety of Grand Canyon gifts.
    • Rent a bicycle or take a guided bicycle tour, available March through October. A coffee bar with "grab and go" food options is located here. 
  • Trail View Point

    Stunning view of a big part of the Bright Angel Trail. Absolutely stunning!

  • Maricopa Point

    Hermit Road vista with exceptional rim views of canyon, river & an old copper & uranium mine.

  • Powell Point

    The best thing about this point is the small path that extends into the canyon. There is a raised platform at the end of the path that allows a very good 360 view of the area.

  • Hopi Point

    South Rim overlook with unobstructed canyon vistas & popular stop for sunrise & sunset viewing. 

  • Mohave Point

    South Rim overlook with wide vistas of terraced cliffs, sandstone mesas & curving Colorado River.

  • The Abyss

    Panoramic viewpoint along Hermits Rest route, with dizzying vertical drops down into canyon bottom. 

  • Monument Creek Vista

  • Pima Point

    Cliffside promontory & scenic South Rim viewpoint overlooking 40 mi. of rugged canyonlands.

  • Hermit Trail

    The Hermit Trail is a hiking trail in Grand Canyon National Park, located in the U.S. state of Arizona. This trail provides access to a historic area of Grand Canyon and offers a more challenging route to the Colorado River for more experienced canyon hikers.

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Motel 6 Page
Cost: 90 USD    Number of rooms: 1
  • Grand Canyon Visitor Center

    If you are entering through the South Entrance Station, make the Visitor Center your first stop. You can park your car in one of four parking areas, then get your first view of Grand Canyon by taking a short walk (or shuttle bus ride) to nearby Mather Point.

    From the Visitor Center, it is also possible to Park-and-Ride. Leave your car and board free shuttle buses to ride around the Village and out to scenic overlooks.

    At the Visitor Center you can:

    • Find information. Outside exhibits discuss park activities and attractions; hiking, the free shuttle bus system and park ranger programs.
    • Watch Grand Canyon: A Journey of Wonder, a 20 minute movie that takes viewers on a rim to river and dawn to dusk journey through the park. Movie starts on the hour and half-hour
    • Explore exhibits inside, including: interactive trip planners, a large video-enabled relief map, a Science On a Sphere® program, and displays of historic artifacts.
    • Stop at the Park Store for books and a variety of Grand Canyon gifts.
    • Rent a bicycle or take a guided bicycle tour, available March through October. A coffee bar with "grab and go" food options is located here. 
  • Yaki Point

     Nature's Manifest, friendliness of this tribe's working during tis stop.

  • Grandview Point

    South Rim viewpoint overlooking a panorama of colorful canyons, ridges & the snaking Colorado River. 

  • Desert View Watchtower

    Stone tower rising 7 stories designed in 1932 by Mary Colter, a pioneering Grand Canyon architect. 

  • Desert View Visitor Center

    East Entrance of Grand Canyon Village.

  • Horseshoe Bend

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  • Lake Powell

    Lake Powell is a reservoir on the Colorado River, straddling the border between Utah and Arizona.Encompassing over 1.25 million acres, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area offers unparalleled opportunities for water-based & backcountry recreation. The recreation area stretches for hundreds of miles from Lees Ferry in Arizona to the Orange Cliffs of southern Utah, encompassing scenic vistas, geologic wonders, and a vast panorama of human history.

     

     

  • Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park Visitor Center

    Welcome to the Navajo Nation's Monument Valley Park.  You are experiencing one of the most majestic - and most photographed - points on earth.

    This great valley boasts sandstone masterpieces that tower at heights of 400 to 1,000 feet. framed by scenic clouds casting shadows that graciously roam the desert floor. The angle of the sun accents these graceful formations, providing scenery that is simply spellbinding.

  • Merrick's Butte

    Merrick Butte is a butte located in Monument Valley in extreme northeast Navajo County, Arizona. It is located 1.4 miles east of the monument headquarters and 1.25 miles south of the Arizona–Utah state line.It is part of the Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park and is similar to its neighbors West and East Mitten Buttes just to the north.

  • West and East Mitten Buttes

    West and East Mitten Buttes are two distinctive geological features found within the Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park in northeast Navajo County, Arizona. When viewed from the south, the buttes appear to be two gigantic mittens with their thumbs facing inwards.

    The two buttes are about 0.6 miles (0.97 km) from the Arizona–Utah state line and West Mitten Butte is 1.1 miles (1.8 km) northeast of the park headquarters.The summit of West Mitten Butte is 6,176 feet (1,882 m) and East Mitten Butte is 6,226 feet (1,898 m) in elevation.

    The Mittens form a triangle with Merrick Butte about 2/3 of a mile to the south and, with Sentinel Mesa.

    The buttes are made of three principal rock layers. The lowest layer is Organ Rock Shale, the middle is de Chelly Sandstone, and the top layer is the Moenkopi Formation capped by Shinarump Conglomerate.

  • Artist's Point

    Artist's Point, place where artists can create landscape and bring them to life on their canvas. 

  • Three Sisters

    The Three Sisters is a formation of Catholic nun facing her two pupils. 

  • North Window Drive

    North Window-­ overlooks the northern view of the lower valley. On the left is Elephant Butte. On the right is Cly Butte, Cly (Navajo name for Left), is named after a well known Navajo medicine man, he is buried at the foot of the formation.

  • Arches National Park Visitor Center & Park Headquarters

    Arches National Park is a US National Park in eastern Utah. The park is located on the Colorado River 4 miles north of Moab, Utah.

    Visit Arches and discover a landscape of contrasting colors, landforms and textures unlike any other in the world. The park has over 2,000 natural stone arches, in addition to hundreds of soaring pinnacles, massive fins and giant balanced rocks. This red rock wonderland will amaze you with its formations, refresh you with its trails, and inspire you with its sunsets.

  • Balanced Rock

    Landmark featuring a huge sandstone block appearing to balance precariously on a thin rock column. 

  • Delicate Arch Trail

    The Delicate Arch Trail to see Delicate Arch up close and personal is 3 miles (4.8 km) roundtrip and climbs 480 feet (146m). Along this steadily uphill trail, hikers also pass the Wolfe Ranch cabin and a wall of Ute Indian petroglyphs. Carefully consider weather conditions (summer heat or winter ice) and your own health and fitness before beginning this hike. 

  • Delicate Arch

    Delicate Arch is on the top of many visitors' to-do lists. In a park with over 2,000 stone arches, this particular free-standing arch has become a widely recognized symbol of the state of Utah and one of the most famous geologic features in the world.

    The light opening beneath the arch is 64 feet high and 45 feet wide, making it the largest free-standing arch in the park. It has had more than a few names in its history, from the colorful ("Cowboy's Chaps", "Old Maid's Bloomers") to the prosaic ("Salt Wash Arch"). The term "Delicate" first appeared in a January 1934 article about the Arches National Monument Scientific Expedition, which described it as "the most delicately chiseled arch in the entire area."

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Arches National Park Salt Lake City
Cost: ? USD
  • Arches National Park Visitor Center & Park Headquarters

    Arches National Park is a US National Park in eastern Utah. The park is located on the Colorado River 4 miles north of Moab, Utah.

    Visit Arches and discover a landscape of contrasting colors, landforms and textures unlike any other in the world. The park has over 2,000 natural stone arches, in addition to hundreds of soaring pinnacles, massive fins and giant balanced rocks. This red rock wonderland will amaze you with its formations, refresh you with its trails, and inspire you with its sunsets.

  • North Window

    Arch on the north side of the Windows, a sandstone fin featuring 2 massive, eye-shaped openings.

  • South Window

    Arch on the south side of the Windows, a sandstone fin featuring 2 massive, eye-shaped openings. 

  • Turret Arch

    Sandstone fin featuring large & small openings & a taller, turret-like rock pillar to the side.

  • Landscape Arch

    Arches' longest sandstone span, measuring 290 ft. across, accessible via the Devils Garden trail.

  • Salt Lake Temple

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Salt Lake City Teton County
Cost: ? USD
Jackson Lake Lodge    Check rate
Cost: 292 USD    Number of rooms: 1
  • Jackson

    Jackson is a town in the Jackson Hole valley of Teton County, Wyoming, United States. It is the county seat of Teton County and is its largest town.

    Jackson is a very popular tourist town bringing in tourists from all over the country. Throughout the town elk antler arches are a big attraction that tourists enjoy.

  • Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center

    Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center(Moose Visitor Center)--Information, an extensive bookstore, maps, activity schedules, guided walks and talks, mountaineering exhibit, state-of-the-art exhibits, park documentary produced by Discovery Communications, Inc., backcountry camping permits, boat permits, restrooms, telephones, WiFi. A post office is located nearby.

  • Grand Teton National Park Headquarters

    Moose Entrance,South Entrance of Grand Teton National Park.

  • Jenny Lake Visitor Center

    Grand Teton visitor center, open May–Sep, offering maps, ranger programs & camping information.

  • Jenny Lake Boating

    Shuttles run every 10-15 minutes throughout the day. The last boat will leave the dock at the posted closing time.

    Jenny Lake Boating offers shuttle service across Jenny Lake at the base of Mount Teewinot. On the West side of the lake you will find the Cascade Canyon trailhead. 

     

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Lake Yellowstone Hotel & Cabins
Cost: 210 USD    Number of rooms: 1
  • Oxbow Bend

    Viewpoint taking in a wildlife-rich riverbend & Mt. Moran, which is often reflected in the water.

    Shooting the sunrise.
  • Snake River Overlook

    Iconic view, famously photographed by Ansel Adams, of Teton peaks rising beyond a bend in the river.

  • Schwabacher's Landing

    Snake River scenic area with views of jagged Teton peaks, which are often reflected in the water. 

  • Blacktail Ponds Overlook

  • Jackson Lake Overlook

    Jackson Lake is in Grand Teton National Park in northwestern Wyoming.This natural lake was enlarged by the construction of the Jackson Lake Dam, which was originally built in 1911, enlarged in 1916 and rebuilt by 1989.The top 33 ft (10 m) of the lake is utilized by farmers in Idaho for irrigation purposes. The lake is the remnant of large glacial gouging from the neighboring Teton Rangeto the west and the Yellowstone Plateau to the north.

    The lake is primarily fed by the Snake River, which flows in from the north, and empties at Jackson Lake Dam. Jackson Lake is one of the largest high altitude lakes in the United States, at an elevation of 6,772 ft (2,064 m) above sea level. The lake is up to 15 mi (24 km) long, 7 mi (11 km) wide and 438 ft (134 m) deep. The water of the lake averages below 60 °F (16 °C), even during the summer.

  • Yellowstone - South Entrance

    Open (weather dependent) to automobiles from the second Friday in May through early November and to tracked-oversnow vehicles (snowcoaches and snowmobiles) from December 15 to March 15. Limited services are available near the South Entrance. The closest airline service to the South Entrance is Jackson, WY. Be sure to check our Park Roads page for the current year opening dates.

  • West Thumb Geyser Basin

    West Thumb was created approximately 162,000 years ago when a magma chamber bulged up under the surface of the earth and subsequently cracked it along ring fracture zones. This in turn released the enclosed magma as lava and caused the surface above the emptied magma chamber to collapse.Water later filled the collapsed area of the caldera, forming an extension of Yellowstone Lake. This created the source of heat and water that feed the West Thumb Geyser Basin today.

  • Fishing Bridge RV Park

    The original bridge was built in 1902. It was a rough-hewn corduroy log bridge with a slightly different alignment than the current bridge. The existing bridge was built in 1937. The Fishing Bridge was historically a tremendously popular place to fish. Angling from the bridge was quite good, due to the fact that it was a major spawning area for cutthroat trout. However, because of the decline of the cutthroat population(in part, a result of this practice), the bridge was closed to fishing in 1973. Since that time, it has become a popular place to observe fish.

  • Yellowstone Lake

    Visit the Shore of Yellowstone Lake:

    Geologists indicate that large volcanic eruptionshave occurred in Yellowstone on an approximate interval of 600,000 years. The most recent of these (600,000 years ago) erupted from two large vents, one near Old Faithful, the Mallard Lake Dome, and one just north of Fishing Bridge, the Sour Creek Dome. Ash from this huge explosion, 1,000 times the size of Mt. St. Helens, has been found all across the continent. The magma chamber then collapsed, forming a large caldera filled partially by subsequent lava flows. Part of this caldera is the 136-square mile basin of Yellowstone Lake. The original lake was 200 ft. higher than the present-day lake, extending northward across Hayden Valley to the base of Mt. Washburn.

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Mammoth Hot Springs Hotel    Check rate
Cost: 220 USD    Number of rooms: 1
  • Mud Volcano

    The thermal features at Mud Volcano and Sulphur Caldron are primarily mud pots and fumaroles because the area is situated on a perched water system with little water available. Fumaroles or "steam vents" occur when the ground water boils away faster than it can be recharged. Also, the vapors are rich in sulfuric acid that leaches the rock, breaking it down into clay. Because no water washes away the acid or leached rock, it remains as sticky clay to form a mud pot. Hydrogen sulfide gas is present deep in the earth at Mud Volcano. As this gas combines with water and the sulfur is metabolized by cyanobacteria, a solution of sulfuric acid is formed that dissolves the surface soils to create pools and cones of clay and mud. Along with hydrogen sulfide, steam, carbon dioxide, and other gases explode through the layers of mud. A series of shallow earthquakes associated with the volcanic activity in Yellowstone struck this area in 1978. Soil temperatures increased to nearly 200°F (93°C).

  • Hayden Valley

    Hayden Valley is an excellent place to view wildlife, including grizzly bears, particularly in the spring and early summer when they may be preying upon newborn bison and elk calves. Large herds of bison are often seen in the spring and early summer and during the fall rut. Coyotes are often seen in the valley. Bird life is abundant in and along the river. A variety of shore birds may be seen in the mud flats at Alum Creek. Ducks, geese, and American white pelicans cruise the river.Bird watchers should look for bald eagles, northern harriers, and sandhill cranes.

  • Uncle Tom's Trail

    Uncle Tom's Trail is a steep stairway descent from the south rim of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone to a viewpoint near the base of the Lower Yellowstone Falls in Yellowstone National Park.

    The trail was constructed in 1898 by park concessionaire, "Uncle Tom" H. F. Richardson when the Department of the Interior granted Richardson a permit to operate a ferry across the Yellowstone River. He ferried park visitors across the Yellowstone River above the current site of the Chittenden Memorial Bridge then escorted them to the trail and they traveled down to the base of the Lower Falls via ladders and ropes. Upon their return, visitors were provided a picnic lunch on the south rim of the canyon before returning via the ferry. In 1903 when the original Chittenden Bridge was built, Richardson's ferry business began to decline. In 1905, when the government built a wooden stairway, visitors were increasingly unwilling to pay Richardson the $1 fee for the tour to the base of the falls. 1906 was the last year he operated tours in the canyon.The trail has been maintained and improved by the National Park Service to this day.

  • Artist Point

    Artist Point is a cliff on the south rim of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone due west of Yellowstone Falls on the Yellowstone River in Yellowstone National Park. The point was originally named in 1883 by Frank Jay Haynes who improperly believed that the point was the place at which painter Thomas Moran sketched his 1872 depictions of the falls. Later work determined that the sketches were made from the north rim, but the name Artist Point stuck.

  • North Rim Drive

    The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone is best viewed via the two roads off the Grand Loop. The South Rim Drive takes you to Artist Point and the North Rim Drive provides views from Lookout Point, Grand View Point and Inspiration Point. Both drives will provide views of the Upper and Lower Falls.

  • Brink of the Lower Falls

    The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone is roughly 20 miles long, measured from the Upper Falls to the Tower Fall area. The canyon was formed by erosion as Yellowstone River flowed over progressively softer, less resistant rock.

    The Lower Falls is 308 ft. high and can be seen from Lookout Point, Red Rock Point, Artist Point, Brink of the Lower Falls Trail, and from various points on the South Rim Trail. The Lower Falls is often described as being more than twice the size of Niagara, although this only refers to its height and not the volume of water flowing over it. The volume of water flowing over the falls can vary from 63,500 gal/sec at peak runoff to 5,000 gal/sec in the fall. A third falls is located the canyon between the Upper and Lower falls. Crystal Falls is the outfall of Cascade Creek into the canyon. It can be seen from the South Rim Trail just east of the Uncle Tom's area. The canyon was a barrier to early travel, but became a destination for visitors when roads made the park more accessible. 

  • Lookout Point

    This was a popular lookout for many early visitors to the park. Noticing that it got regular visitation, in 1880 Superintendent P.W. Norris built a railing here and the location has been called Lookout Point ever since. It is likely that this was the superintendents preferred name for the spot. It had been called many things prior to 1880 including Point Lookout, Lookout Rock, Mount Lookout, and Prospect Point.

  • Grand View

    Another beautiful vista point on the North Rim Drive of the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone to get good vistas of the Falls and the Canyon. Photographers will love this vista point.

  • Inspiration Point

    It is at a is a natural observation point where the canyon wall juts far out into the canyon allowing spectacular views both upstream and down. Along the road to Inspiration Point there is a house-sized granite boulder sitting in the pine forest alongside the road. It was plucked from the Beartooth Mountains by an early Pinedale Glacier and dropped on the north rim of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone nearly 80,000 years ago. Continued glacial advances and retreats led to the present-day appearance of the canyon and surrounding area.

  • Tower Fall

    132-ft. falls, seen from an overlook with a general store above or via a short hike to the bottom.

  • Lamar Valley

    River valley area of Yellowstone with a panoramic driving route amid herds of bison & other animals.

  • Lower Terraces Area

    As one early visitor described the Mammoth Hot Springs terraces, "No human architect ever designed such intricate fountains as these. The water trickles over the edges from one to another, blending them together with the effect of a frozen waterfall." The hot springs were an early commercialized attraction for those seeking relief from ailments in the mineral waters.

    Mammoth Hot Springs are a surface expression of the deep volcanic forces at work in Yellowstone. Although these springs lie outside the caldera boundary, scientists surmise that the heat from the hot springs comes from the same magmatic system that fuels other Yellowstone thermal areas. A large fault system runs between Norris Geyser Basin and Mammoth, which may allow thermal water to flow between the two. Also, multiple basalt eruptions have occurred in this area. Thus, basalt may be a heat source for the Mammoth area.

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  • Norris Geyser Basin Museum

    Norris Geyser Basin is the hottest, oldest, and most dynamic of Yellowstone's thermal areas. The highest temperature yet recorded in any geothermal area in Yellowstone was measured in a scientific drill hole at Norris: 459°F (237°C) just 1,087 feet below the surface! There are very few thermal features at Norris under the boiling point (199°F at this elevation).

    Norris shows evidence of having had thermal features for at least 115,000 years. The features in the basin change daily, with frequent disturbances from seismic activity and water fluctuations. The vast majority of the waters at Norris are acidic, including acid geysers which are very rare. Steamboat Geyser, the tallest geyser in the world (300 to 400 feet) and Echinus Geyser (pH 3.5 or so) are the most popular features.

    The basin consists of two areas: Porcelain Basin and the Back Basin. Porcelain Basin is barren of trees and provides a sensory experience in sound, color, and smell; a 3/4 mile dirt and boardwalk trail accesses this area. Back Basin is more heavily wooded with features scattered throughout the area; a 1.5 mile trail of boardwalk and dirt encircles this part of the basin.The area was named after Philetus W. Norris, the second superintendent of Yellowstone, who provided the first detailed information about the thermal features.

  • Grand Prismatic Spring

    The Grand Prismatic Spring in Yellowstone National Park is the largest hot spring in the United States, and the third largest in the world,after Frying Pan Lake in New Zealand and Boiling Lake in Dominica. It is located in the Midway Geyser Basin.

    Grand Prismatic Spring was noted by geologists working in the Hayden Geological Survey of 1871, and named by them for its striking coloration. Its colors match the rainbow dispersion of white light by an optical prism: red, orange, yellow, green, and blue.

  • Biscuit Basin

    Biscuit Basin:This area has a very short boardwalk that takes you to a number of really beautiful thermal features, including the Sapphire Pool!

  • Morning Glory Pool

    Morning Glory Pool is a hot spring in the Upper Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park in the United States.

  • Old Faithful

    Old Faithful is a cone geyser located in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, United States. Old Faithful was named in 1870 during the Washburn-Langford-Doane Expedition and was the first geyser in the park to receive a name.It is one of the most predictable geographical features on Earth, erupting every 35 to 120 minutes. The geyser, as well as the nearby Old Faithful Inn, is part of the Old Faithful Historic District.

  • Yellowstone - South Entrance

    Open (weather dependent) to automobiles from the second Friday in May through early November and to tracked-oversnow vehicles (snowcoaches and snowmobiles) from December 15 to March 15. Limited services are available near the South Entrance. The closest airline service to the South Entrance is Jackson, WY. Be sure to check our Park Roads page for the current year opening dates.

  • Jackson

    Jackson is a town in the Jackson Hole valley of Teton County, Wyoming, United States. It is the county seat of Teton County and is its largest town.

    Jackson is a very popular tourist town bringing in tourists from all over the country. Throughout the town elk antler arches are a big attraction that tourists enjoy.

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Teton County Los Angeles
Cost: ? USD
  • Jackson Hole Airport

  • Los Angeles International Airport (LAX)

    There are nine passenger terminals at LAX, numbered 1–8 and the last one is Tom Bradley Tom Bradley International Terminal. Shuttle bus runs among the terminals – use line A. The bus runs every 10 minutes. You can easily get to and from the Metro Green Line Aviation Station by the free shuttle service, line G. To get to the Metro Bus Center, use the line C. Roadrunner Shuttle operates long-distance vans. FlyAway Shuttle is a non-stop bus service to several parts of Los Angeles. No booking is required. If you wish to rent a car, you can choose from more than 40 rental companies at this airport. Several of them are allowed to pick you up at the Arrivals, for others, call ahead and then take a shuttle to Off-Airport Rental Car Terminal. You can also find taxis in the Arrivals area. The rates for parking start at USD 2 for 30 minutes and at USD 12 for 24 hours. Free wi-fi is available in the most areas of the airport. You can also choose Premium access for higher speed.
  • Hollywood Walk of Fame

  • TCL Chinese Theatre

    The most important landmark of Hollywood is the Chinese Theater located in Hollywood Blvd, it is famous for the fingerprints,footprints of the famous stars, attracting tourists from Various countries to see the stars's footprints. The founder Sid Grauman build the Chinese theater in 1918.

    The Chinese Theater opened in May 1927, well-known as the appearance of Chinese ancient palatial architecture.At the front of the theatre have huge portraits of every successive academy award winners and biographies, but here there will be a leading role to this stage at the every film premieres, so the theatre can have great fame. However,the most attractive is the footprints left by nearly 200 stars at the front of the Chinese Theater, each tourist,was always busying with filming their idol's footprints, or put their hands on stars's handprint to do some comparison.



     

  • Dolby Theatre

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  • Universal Studio Hollywood

    Universal Studio Hollywood is the world's largest theme park of movie and television studios and film subjects, located in the Universal City of near world famous holy Hollywood movies, is one of several famous tourist attractions near around the City of Los Angeles.In the Universal Studios,you can visit the actual film production behind the scenes and special photography, Backlot Tram, will pass along the King Kong,the Earthquake, the Jaws and other film scenes, experience the shock of the gorilla, the horrors of the Earthquake, the great white shark and volcanic eruptions.Tram also will pass along some film shooting area,such as Western Town, New York, London, Berlin in Germany, and the ancient city of Rome.

    The Universal Studio has the Entertainment Center and the Studio Center two parts.The Lower Lot is a performance entertainment center, inclusive of the World Water named from the same movie,designed water war performance, splash, very stimulating, the audience in the front rows must be wetted the whole body by splashing!In addition, there are west of the gun war, under the performance of bullets, the stimulation of very realistic.

    After visiting you can directly visit pedestrian shopping area City Walk nearby,all shops, restaurants, cinemas modelling with the lively giant signs attracts tourists, let visitors immediately enjoy strong visual stimulation, exciting, City Walk don't accept the tickets.
  • Universal Citywalk (Hollywood)

    High-energy hub of shops, eateries & nightclubs plus entertainment such as a cinema & bowling alley.

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  • Disneyland Park

    The Disneyland Resort is located in Anaheim, California. It is home to the original Disneyland Park, which opened on July 17, 1955, a favorite among visitors to Southern California from all over the world for well over half a century. It was joined in 2001 by a sister park, Disney California Adventure, which is a stylized recreation and celebration of California's rich history and culture.

    The Disneyland Resort is divided into two separate theme parks, three hotels, and a shopping and entertainment district. The first park is the original Disney theme park Disneyland, which opened on July 17, 1955. Its sister park Disney California Adventure, which opened in February 2001, is located across the entry plaza on the former site of Disneyland's parking lot. Both parks are divided into "lands", or themes. At the western end of the entry plaza is Downtown Disney, the shopping and entertainment district. The three hotels are located at the west end of Downtown Disney.

    Disneyland is one of the most visited theme parks in the world (with 15.98 million visits in 2010, based on the TEA/ERA figures, second only to the Magic Kingdom at Walt Disney World), so the parks can be pretty crowded, especially during the weekends, Summer, and Winter holidays, which leads to long lines for the most popular attractions. However, if you visit in the late Winter or early Spring, off-season lines can be short, especially during the weekdays. Disney California Adventure has fewer attractions but still has long lines, although not as long as Disneyland's attractions.