25 Days of Self-Driving Honeymoon Tour Across the U. S. triptoto
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  • Seattle Aquarium

  • Olympic Sculpture Park

  • Seattle Center

    Originally built for the 1962 World's Fair, the 74-acre Seattle Center is a park, arts, and entertainment center in Seattle. Its landmark feature is the 605-foot tall Space Needle, a now-iconic building that was, at its completion, the tallest building west of the Mississippi River.

    Attractions and activities in the region are: The International Fountain,The Space Needle,The Seattle Center Armory,The Experience Music Project/Science Fiction Museum and Hall of Fame,The Chihuly Garden and Glass Museum,The Fisher Pavilion,The Pacific Science Center,The Seattle Center Pavilion,Seattle Center Skate Park,Children's Museum,etc.

  • Space Needle

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Seattle Missoula
Cost: ? USD
Motel 6 Missoula
Cost: 60 USD    Number of rooms: 1
  • Pike Place Market

  • Gum Wall

    What a unique and wonderfully disgusting sight to see in Seattle, Washington!

  • Chihuly Garden and Glass

  • Pacific Science Center

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Missoula Yellowstone National Park
Cost: ? USD
Mammoth Hot Springs Hotel    Check rate
Cost: 260 USD    Number of rooms: 1
  • Yellowstone Northeast Entrance Station

    The Northeast Entrance Ranger Station was constructed in 1934-35 and is a National Historic Landmark. Its rustic log construction is characteristic of "parkitecture" common in the national parks of the west during that period.

  • Lamar Valley

    River valley area of Yellowstone with a panoramic driving route amid herds of bison & other animals.

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Lake lodge    Check rate
Cost: ? USD    Number of rooms: ?
  • Lower Terraces Area

    As one early visitor described the Mammoth Hot Springs terraces, "No human architect ever designed such intricate fountains as these. The water trickles over the edges from one to another, blending them together with the effect of a frozen waterfall." The hot springs were an early commercialized attraction for those seeking relief from ailments in the mineral waters.

    Mammoth Hot Springs are a surface expression of the deep volcanic forces at work in Yellowstone. Although these springs lie outside the caldera boundary, scientists surmise that the heat from the hot springs comes from the same magmatic system that fuels other Yellowstone thermal areas. A large fault system runs between Norris Geyser Basin and Mammoth, which may allow thermal water to flow between the two. Also, multiple basalt eruptions have occurred in this area. Thus, basalt may be a heat source for the Mammoth area.

  • Norris Geyser Basin Museum

    Norris Geyser Basin is the hottest, oldest, and most dynamic of Yellowstone's thermal areas. The highest temperature yet recorded in any geothermal area in Yellowstone was measured in a scientific drill hole at Norris: 459°F (237°C) just 1,087 feet below the surface! There are very few thermal features at Norris under the boiling point (199°F at this elevation).

    Norris shows evidence of having had thermal features for at least 115,000 years. The features in the basin change daily, with frequent disturbances from seismic activity and water fluctuations. The vast majority of the waters at Norris are acidic, including acid geysers which are very rare. Steamboat Geyser, the tallest geyser in the world (300 to 400 feet) and Echinus Geyser (pH 3.5 or so) are the most popular features.

    The basin consists of two areas: Porcelain Basin and the Back Basin. Porcelain Basin is barren of trees and provides a sensory experience in sound, color, and smell; a 3/4 mile dirt and boardwalk trail accesses this area. Back Basin is more heavily wooded with features scattered throughout the area; a 1.5 mile trail of boardwalk and dirt encircles this part of the basin.The area was named after Philetus W. Norris, the second superintendent of Yellowstone, who provided the first detailed information about the thermal features.

  • Grand Prismatic Spring

    The Grand Prismatic Spring in Yellowstone National Park is the largest hot spring in the United States, and the third largest in the world,after Frying Pan Lake in New Zealand and Boiling Lake in Dominica. It is located in the Midway Geyser Basin.

    Grand Prismatic Spring was noted by geologists working in the Hayden Geological Survey of 1871, and named by them for its striking coloration. Its colors match the rainbow dispersion of white light by an optical prism: red, orange, yellow, green, and blue.

  • Old Faithful

    Old Faithful is a cone geyser located in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, United States. Old Faithful was named in 1870 during the Washburn-Langford-Doane Expedition and was the first geyser in the park to receive a name.It is one of the most predictable geographical features on Earth, erupting every 35 to 120 minutes. The geyser, as well as the nearby Old Faithful Inn, is part of the Old Faithful Historic District.

  • West Thumb Geyser Basin

    West Thumb was created approximately 162,000 years ago when a magma chamber bulged up under the surface of the earth and subsequently cracked it along ring fracture zones. This in turn released the enclosed magma as lava and caused the surface above the emptied magma chamber to collapse.Water later filled the collapsed area of the caldera, forming an extension of Yellowstone Lake. This created the source of heat and water that feed the West Thumb Geyser Basin today.

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  • Fishing Bridge RV Park

    The original bridge was built in 1902. It was a rough-hewn corduroy log bridge with a slightly different alignment than the current bridge. The existing bridge was built in 1937. The Fishing Bridge was historically a tremendously popular place to fish. Angling from the bridge was quite good, due to the fact that it was a major spawning area for cutthroat trout. However, because of the decline of the cutthroat population(in part, a result of this practice), the bridge was closed to fishing in 1973. Since that time, it has become a popular place to observe fish.

  • South Rim Drive

    The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone is best viewed via the two roads off the Grand Loop. The South Rim Drive takes you to Artist Point and the North Rim Drive provides views from Lookout Point, Grand View Point and Inspiration Point.

  • North Rim Drive

    The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone is best viewed via the two roads off the Grand Loop. The South Rim Drive takes you to Artist Point and the North Rim Drive provides views from Lookout Point, Grand View Point and Inspiration Point. Both drives will provide views of the Upper and Lower Falls.

  • Brink of the Lower Falls

    The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone is roughly 20 miles long, measured from the Upper Falls to the Tower Fall area. The canyon was formed by erosion as Yellowstone River flowed over progressively softer, less resistant rock.

    The Lower Falls is 308 ft. high and can be seen from Lookout Point, Red Rock Point, Artist Point, Brink of the Lower Falls Trail, and from various points on the South Rim Trail. The Lower Falls is often described as being more than twice the size of Niagara, although this only refers to its height and not the volume of water flowing over it. The volume of water flowing over the falls can vary from 63,500 gal/sec at peak runoff to 5,000 gal/sec in the fall. A third falls is located the canyon between the Upper and Lower falls. Crystal Falls is the outfall of Cascade Creek into the canyon. It can be seen from the South Rim Trail just east of the Uncle Tom's area. The canyon was a barrier to early travel, but became a destination for visitors when roads made the park more accessible. 

  • Lookout Point

    This was a popular lookout for many early visitors to the park. Noticing that it got regular visitation, in 1880 Superintendent P.W. Norris built a railing here and the location has been called Lookout Point ever since. It is likely that this was the superintendents preferred name for the spot. It had been called many things prior to 1880 including Point Lookout, Lookout Rock, Mount Lookout, and Prospect Point.

  • Grand View

    Another beautiful vista point on the North Rim Drive of the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone to get good vistas of the Falls and the Canyon. Photographers will love this vista point.

  • Inspiration Point

    It is at a is a natural observation point where the canyon wall juts far out into the canyon allowing spectacular views both upstream and down. Along the road to Inspiration Point there is a house-sized granite boulder sitting in the pine forest alongside the road. It was plucked from the Beartooth Mountains by an early Pinedale Glacier and dropped on the north rim of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone nearly 80,000 years ago. Continued glacial advances and retreats led to the present-day appearance of the canyon and surrounding area.

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Hampton Inn Salt Lake City - Murray
Cost: 89 USD    Number of rooms: 1
  • Yellowstone - South Entrance

    Open (weather dependent) to automobiles from the second Friday in May through early November and to tracked-oversnow vehicles (snowcoaches and snowmobiles) from December 15 to March 15. Limited services are available near the South Entrance. The closest airline service to the South Entrance is Jackson, WY. Be sure to check our Park Roads page for the current year opening dates.

  • Colter Bay Village

    When the family is ready for adventure and a picture-perfect vacation destination, come and see us at Colter Bay Village. You’ll find charming mountain cabins right on a beautiful lake that is bustling with activity. Located on the shores of Jackson Lake with the majestic Grand Tetons as a backdrop, lodging at Colter Bay Village could be just what your family vacation needs.

    Think of Colter Bay Village as summer camp for the entire family kayaking, canoeing, horseback riding, log cabins, and a general store. This resort village on the northern shore of Jackson Lake has it all, and provides affordable vacationing. It’s everything you would want in a genuine Grand Teton National Park vacation. Picture a bustling marina with everything from boat rentals and gear shops to restaurants and a museum. On the wooded hill nearby, you will find a variety of accommodations where families of all types prepare for the day’s adventure. Colter Bay is an endless, untamed, Jackson Hole type of adventure.

  • Snake River Overlook

    Iconic view, famously photographed by Ansel Adams, of Teton peaks rising beyond a bend in the river.

  • Grand Teton National Park Headquarters

    Moose Entrance,South Entrance of Grand Teton National Park.

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  • Great Salt Lake State Park

    This State Park provides boat slips, public viewpoints of Great Salt Lake, sail and motorboat access, and a search and rescue operations center. The lake, which is two to seven times saltier than the ocean, is also a popular destination for bird watching as it is a major stop for millions of migratory birds.

  • Temple Square

  • The Tabernacle on Temple Square

    Beautiful architecture; interesting history. Grounds immaculate and the infinity pool is quite impressive!

  • The Beehive House

    Mid-19th-century home of Brigham Young during his tenure as Mormon head & Utah territory governor. 

  • Family History Library

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Salt Lake City San Francisco
Cost: ? USD
  • No plan created yet.
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  • Lombard Street

  • Pier 33

  • Alcatraz Island

    Alcatraz Island offers a close-up look at the site of the first lighthouse and US built fort on the West Coast, the infamous federal penitentiary long off-limits to the public, and the history making 18 month occupation by Indians of All Tribes. Rich in history, there is also a natural side to the Rock—gardens, tide pools, bird colonies, and bay views beyond compare.

  • Pier 39

  • Fisherman's Wharf

  • Golden Gate Bridge

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  • Stanford University

    Visit our historic Main Quad with its distinct Richardsonian Romanesque and California Mission Revival architecture or see our new Science and Engineering Quad, which beautifully incorporates modern and technological elements with timeless, elegant aesthetics and an abundance of outdoor space.

    • Pick up a self-guided tour map and walk around campus at your leisure, or take a one-hour, student-led Campus Walking Tour at 11am or 3:15pm.
    • See a panoramic view of the area from the Hoover Tower observation platform, 285 feet above Stanford’s campus.
    • Enjoy a meal at one of our many campus eateries or dining halls.
    • Stop in at the Herbert Hoover Memorial Exhibit Pavilion.
  • Silicon Valley

    Silicon Valley, in the southern San Francisco Bay Area of California, is home to many start-up and global technology companies. Apple, Facebook and Google are among the most prominent. It’s also the site of technology-focused institutions centered around Palo Alto's Stanford University. The Computer History Museum and NASA’s Ames Research Center are in Mountain View. The Tech Museum of Innovation is in San Jose.

  • 17 Mile Dr Bay Skyline

    America's famous high-end luxury mansion district in 17 Miles Drive along the line, so we can imagine how beautiful the scenery here! Because expensive villas, beautiful scenery, has become the focus of a tour in California, the car was moved into this segment route charges, pedestrians and bicycles free of charge.

    Primary scenic attractions include Cypress Point, Bird Rock, Point Joe, Pescadero Point, Fanshell Beach & Seal Point. The famous "Witch Tree" landmark, often used as scenic background in movies and television, was formerly at Pescadero Point. The tree was blown down by a storm on January 14, 1964. Pescadero Point is also the site of the Ghost Tree, a landmark Monterey Cypress tree. The tree gives its name to a dangerous extreme surfing location known to have storm waves.Currently, the surf break of Ghost Tree is off limits to surfers and watercraft.

  • Carmel-by-the-Sea

    Carmel-by-the-Sea, often simply referred to as Carmel, is a city in Monterey County, California, United States, founded in 1902 and incorporated on October 31, 1916. Situated on the Monterey Peninsula, Carmel is known for its natural scenery and rich artistic history. In 1906, the San Francisco Call devoted a full page to the "artists, writers and poets at Carmel-by-the-Sea",and in 1910 it reported that 60 percent of Carmel's houses were built by citizens who were "devoting their lives to work connected to the aesthetic arts." Early City Councils were dominated by artists, and the city has had several mayors who were poets or actors, including Herbert Heron, founder of the Forest Theater, bohemian writer and actor Perry Newberry, and actor-director Clint Eastwood.

    The city is known for being dog-friendly, with numerous hotels, restaurants and retail establishments admitting guests with dogs. Carmel is also known for several unusual laws, including a prohibition on wearing high-heel shoes without a permit, enacted to prevent lawsuits arising from tripping accidents caused by irregular pavement.

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  • Bixby Creek Bridge

    Bixby Creek Bridge, also known as Bixby Bridge, is a reinforced concrete open-spandrel arch bridge in Big Sur, California. The bridge is located 120 miles south of San Francisco and 13 miles south of Carmel in Monterey County along State Route 1. Prior to the opening of the bridge in 1932, residents of the Big Sur area were virtually cut off during winter due to the often impassable Old Coast Road that led 11 miles inland. At its completion, the bridge was built under budget for $199,861 (equivalent to $3.5 million in 2015) and was the longest concrete arch span at 320 feet on the California State Highway System. It is one of the tallest single-span concrete bridges in the world and one of the most photographed bridges along the Pacific Coast due to its aesthetic design and location.

  • Big Sur

    Big Sur, described in 1912 as the "greatest meeting of land and water in the world,"is a undeveloped, lightly populated, unincorporated region on California's Central Coast where the Santa Lucia Mountains rise abruptly from the Pacific Ocean. The coast is frequently praised for its rugged coastline and mountain views. As the "longest and most scenic stretch of undeveloped coastline in the continental United States,"it has been described it as a "national treasure that demands extraordinary procedures to protect it from development,"and "one of the most beautiful coastlines anywhere in the world, an isolated stretch of road, mythic in reputation."Big Sur's Cone Peak at 5,155 feet (1,571 m) is only 3 miles (5 km) from the ocean.The stunning views make Big Sur a popular tourist destination.

  • Piedras Blancas Elephant Seal Rookery

    The Piedras Blancas elephant seal rookery spreads over 6 miles of shoreline around Point Piedras Blancas on the central coast of California. The viewing areas are located 90 miles south of Monterey, 5 miles north of Hearst Castle State Historical Monument in San Simeon, 1.5 miles south of Point Piedras Blancas. The viewing areas are open every day of the year, are wheelchair accessible, and free. No reservations required.

  • Solvang

    Solvang was founded in 1911 on almost 9,000 acres of the Rancho San Carlos de Jonata Mexican land grant, by a group of Danes who traveled west to establish a Danish colony far from the midwestern winters. The city is home to a number of bakeries, restaurants, and merchants offering a taste of Denmark in California. The architecture of many of the façades and buildings reflects traditional Danish style. There is a copy of the famous Little Mermaid statue from Copenhagen, as well as one featuring the bust of famed Danish fable writer Hans Christian Andersen. A replica of Copenhagen's Round Tower or Rundetårn in the scale 1:3 was finished in 1991 and can be seen in the town center.

  • Santa Monica State Beach

    The beach is located along Pacific Coast Highway in Santa Monica. It is 3.5 miles long and has parks, picnic areas, playgrounds, restrooms, as well as manned lifeguard stations, the original Muscle Beach, bike rentals, concessions, a few hotels, a bike path, and wooden pathways for warm days and beachgoers with disabilities.Visitor activities include volleyball, surfing, stand up paddleboarding, and swimming.

    Watching the night scene.
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  • Universal Studio Hollywood

    Universal Studio Hollywood is the world's largest theme park of movie and television studios and film subjects, located in the Universal City of near world famous holy Hollywood movies, is one of several famous tourist attractions near around the City of Los Angeles.In the Universal Studios,you can visit the actual film production behind the scenes and special photography, Backlot Tram, will pass along the King Kong,the Earthquake, the Jaws and other film scenes, experience the shock of the gorilla, the horrors of the Earthquake, the great white shark and volcanic eruptions.Tram also will pass along some film shooting area,such as Western Town, New York, London, Berlin in Germany, and the ancient city of Rome.

    The Universal Studio has the Entertainment Center and the Studio Center two parts.The Lower Lot is a performance entertainment center, inclusive of the World Water named from the same movie,designed water war performance, splash, very stimulating, the audience in the front rows must be wetted the whole body by splashing!In addition, there are west of the gun war, under the performance of bullets, the stimulation of very realistic.

    After visiting you can directly visit pedestrian shopping area City Walk nearby,all shops, restaurants, cinemas modelling with the lively giant signs attracts tourists, let visitors immediately enjoy strong visual stimulation, exciting, City Walk don't accept the tickets.
  • Hollywood Walk of Fame

  • Hollywood Sign

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Los Angeles Death Valley National Park
Cost: ? USD
Stovepipe Wells Village    Check rate
Cost: ? USD    Number of rooms: 1
  • Father Crowley Overlook

    A landscape of dark lava flows and volcanic cinders abruptly gives way to the gash of Rainbow Canyon below this viewpoint. Walk the dirt track east of the parking lot for a grand overlook of northern Panamint Valley. Vista located west of Panamint Springs on Hwy 190.

  • Darwin Falls

    A miracle in the desert, this spring-fed waterfall flows year-round in a narrow gorge. Its lush streamside thickets of willows ring with the song of migrating birds in springtime. Located just west of Panamint Springs via a 2.5 mile unpaved road. Although there is no formal trail, the mostly level, one-mile walk to the falls involves rock scrambling and several stream crossings.

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Death Valley National Park Las Vegas
Cost: ? USD
  • Harmony Borax Works

    Although this borax refinery operated only from 1883 to 1888, it is important as the birthplace of the famous Twenty Mule Teams. Adobe ruins and an original wagon hint at the industrial activity that once was. Interpretive signs along the short, paved trail tell the story. Located one mile north of Furnace Creek on Hwy 190 west.

  • Furnace Creek Visitor Center

    The visitor center is located in the Furnace Creek resort area on California Highway 190. 

  • Dantes View

    Dante’s View: The most breathtaking viewpoint in the park, this mountain-top overlook is more than 5000 feet above the inferno of Death Valley. The paved access road is open to all vehicles less than 25 feet in length and starts east of Furnace Creek on Hwy 190.

  • Zabriskie Point

    Surrounded by a maze of wildly eroded and vibrantly colored badlands, this spectacular view is one of the park’s most famous. Zabriskie Point is a popular sunrise and sunset viewing location. The viewpoint is a short walk uphill from the parking area. Located east of Furnace Creek on Hwy 190.

  • Artists Drive

    Artist’s Drive: Scenic loop drive through multi-hued volcanic and sedimentary hills. Artist’s Palette is especially photogenic in late afternoon light. The 9-mile paved road is one-way and is only drivable with vehicles less than 25 feet in length. Drive starts from Badwater Road.

  • Devils Golf Course

    Devil’s Golf Course: Immense area of rock salt eroded by wind and rain into jagged spires. So incredibly serrated that “only the devil could play golf on such rough links.” The unpaved road starts on Badwater Road and is often closed after rain.

  • Badwater Basin

    Badwater Basin: Lowest point in North America at 282 feet below sea level, Badwater Basin is a surreal landscape of vast salt flats. A temporary lake may form here after heavy rainstorms. Do not walk on the salt flats in hot weather.

  • Fountains of Bellagio

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  • The Venetian

    Opulent, Italian-themed casino hotel offering gondola rides, posh suites, shopping, a spa & dining.

  • Powerhouse Visitors Centre

    Museum with exhibits detailing the historical transformation of the famous Americana icon, Route 66.

  • South Rim Trail

  • Papillon Grand Canyon Helicopters south rim 3stop

    Airplane tour over the Grand Canyon.

    Watch the Grand Canyon by Helicopter.
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Grand Canyon National Park Page
Cost: ? USD
Comfort Inn & Suites Page
Cost: 80 USD    Number of rooms: 1
  • Hermit's Rest

    Hermit Road from the Village Route Transfer to the Hermits Rest about 11 km tourist routes.This extremely popular route is accessed by free park shuttle bus(the red bus), foot, bicycle, or commercial bus tour most of the year, with private vehicles allowed only during winter months of December, January and February.

    Grand canyon here have nearly the best observation, it can be said that the road on the grand canyon is the most classic and magnificent.You can watch the nine spots along the way.

  • Trail View Point

    Stunning view of a big part of the Bright Angel Trail. Absolutely stunning!

  • Maricopa Point

    Hermit Road vista with exceptional rim views of canyon, river & an old copper & uranium mine.

  • Powell Point

    The best thing about this point is the small path that extends into the canyon. There is a raised platform at the end of the path that allows a very good 360 view of the area.

  • Hopi Point

    South Rim overlook with unobstructed canyon vistas & popular stop for sunrise & sunset viewing. 

  • Mohave Point

    South Rim overlook with wide vistas of terraced cliffs, sandstone mesas & curving Colorado River.

  • Desert View Visitor Center

    East Entrance of Grand Canyon Village.

  • The Abyss

    Panoramic viewpoint along Hermits Rest route, with dizzying vertical drops down into canyon bottom. 

  • Monument Creek Vista

  • Pima Point

    Cliffside promontory & scenic South Rim viewpoint overlooking 40 mi. of rugged canyonlands.

  • Hermit Trail

    The Hermit Trail is a hiking trail in Grand Canyon National Park, located in the U.S. state of Arizona. This trail provides access to a historic area of Grand Canyon and offers a more challenging route to the Colorado River for more experienced canyon hikers.

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Kayenta Monument Valley Inn
Cost: 116 USD    Number of rooms: 1
  • Lake Powell

    Lake Powell is a reservoir on the Colorado River, straddling the border between Utah and Arizona.Encompassing over 1.25 million acres, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area offers unparalleled opportunities for water-based & backcountry recreation. The recreation area stretches for hundreds of miles from Lees Ferry in Arizona to the Orange Cliffs of southern Utah, encompassing scenic vistas, geologic wonders, and a vast panorama of human history.

     

     

  • Horseshoe Bend

  • Upper Antelope Canyon

    Antelope Canyon is a popular location for photographers and sightseers, and a source of tourism business for the Navajo Nation. Private tour companies have been permitted to offer tours since 1987. It has been accessible by tour only since 1997, when the Navajo Tribe made it a Navajo Tribal Park. Photography within the canyons is difficult due to the wide exposure range (often 10 EV or more) made by light reflecting off the canyon walls.

    Upper Antelope Canyon is called Tsé bighánílíní, "the place where water runs through rocks" by the Navajo. It is the most frequently visited by tourists for two reasons. First, its entrance and entire length are at ground level, requiring no climbing. Second, beams(shafts of direct sunlight radiating down from openings in the top of the canyon) are much more common in Upper than in Lower. Beams occur most often in the summer months, as they require the sun to be high in the sky. Winter colors are a little more muted like the photo displayed here. Summer months provide two types of lighting. Light beams start to peek into the canyon March 20 and disappear October 7 each year.

  • Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park Visitor Center

    Welcome to the Navajo Nation's Monument Valley Park.  You are experiencing one of the most majestic - and most photographed - points on earth.

    This great valley boasts sandstone masterpieces that tower at heights of 400 to 1,000 feet. framed by scenic clouds casting shadows that graciously roam the desert floor. The angle of the sun accents these graceful formations, providing scenery that is simply spellbinding.

  • West and East Mitten Buttes

    West and East Mitten Buttes are two distinctive geological features found within the Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park in northeast Navajo County, Arizona. When viewed from the south, the buttes appear to be two gigantic mittens with their thumbs facing inwards.

    The two buttes are about 0.6 miles (0.97 km) from the Arizona–Utah state line and West Mitten Butte is 1.1 miles (1.8 km) northeast of the park headquarters.The summit of West Mitten Butte is 6,176 feet (1,882 m) and East Mitten Butte is 6,226 feet (1,898 m) in elevation.

    The Mittens form a triangle with Merrick Butte about 2/3 of a mile to the south and, with Sentinel Mesa.

    The buttes are made of three principal rock layers. The lowest layer is Organ Rock Shale, the middle is de Chelly Sandstone, and the top layer is the Moenkopi Formation capped by Shinarump Conglomerate.

  • Three Sisters

    The Three Sisters is a formation of Catholic nun facing her two pupils. 

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  • The Albuquerque Museum of Art and History

    Local history museum featuring maps, photos & crafts depicting the history of Albuquerque.

  • New Mexico Museum of Art

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  • Entrance of Cadillac Ranch

    It is a pretty cool art display with the ability to make your own message in the form of spray paint.

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  • Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum

  • The Gateway Arch

    Curved, 630-ft.-tall monument celebrating US western expansion, with views from the top & a museum. 

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  • Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library

    The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum documents the life of the 16th U.S. President, Abraham Lincoln, and the course of the American Civil War. Combining traditional scholarship with 21st-century showmanship techniques, the museum ranks as one of the most visited presidential libraries.Its library, in addition to housing an extensive collection on Lincoln, also houses the collection of the Illinois State Historical Library, founded by the state in 1889. The library and museum is located in the state capital of Springfield, Illinois, and is overseen by the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency, an agency of state government. It is not affiliated with the U.S. National Archives and its system of Presidential Libraries.

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  • Museum Of Contemporary Art Chicago

    The Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA) Chicago is a contemporary art museum near Water Tower Place in downtown Chicagoin Cook County. The museum, which was established in 1967, is one of the world's largest contemporary art venues. The museum's collection is composed of thousands of objects of Post-World War II visual art. The museum is run gallery-style, with individually curated exhibitions throughout the year. Each exhibition may be composed of temporary loans, pieces from their permanent collection, or a combination of the two.

  • Navy Pier

    No matter the season, Navy Pier is a fun place to spend a few hours, especially with kids in tow. Constructed in 1916 as a commercial-shipping pier and part of Daniel Burnham's Master Plan of Chicago, it stretches half a mile into Lake Michigan. Redesigned and reopened in 1995, it's a major tourist draw. Outside, there's a landscaped area with gardens, a fountain, a carousel, a 15-story Ferris wheel, and a beer garden. Inside you'll find the Crystal Gardens, a six-story glass atrium that serves as an indoor event venue and botanical park; the Smith Museum of Stained Glass Windows; the Chicago Children's Museum; an IMAX theater; the Chicago Shakespeare Theatre; and a bevy of souvenir shops, restaurants, and bars.

  • Millennium Park

    Millennium Park is a portion of the 319-acre Grant Park, known as the "front lawn" of downtown Chicago,and has four major artistic highlights: the Jay Pritzker Pavilion, Cloud Gate, the Crown Fountain, and the Lurie Garden.

    Millennium Park is successful as a public art venue in part due to the grand scale of each piece and the open spaces for display.Millennium Park is considered one of the largest green roofs in the world, having been constructed on top of a railroad yard and large parking garages.

  • The Art Institute of Chicago

    The Art Institute of Chicago, founded in 1879 and located in Chicago's Grant Park, is one of the oldest and largest art museums in the United States. Recognized for its curatorial efforts and popularity among visitors, the museum hosts approximately 1.5 million guests annually.Its collection—stewarded by 11 curatorial departments—is encyclopedic, and includes iconic works such as Georges Seurat's A Sunday on La Grande Jatte — 1884, Pablo Picasso's The Old Guitarist, Edward Hopper's Nighthawks, and Grant Wood's American Gothic. Its permanent collection of nearly 300,000 works of art is augmented by more than 30 special exhibitions mounted yearly that illuminate aspects of the collection and present cutting-edge curatorial and scientific research.

    As a research institution, the Art Institute also has a conservation and conservation science department, five conservation laboratories, and one of the largest art history and architecture libraries in the country—the Ryerson and Burnham Libraries.

  • Willis Tower

    The Willis Tower, built and still commonly referred to as Sears Tower, is a 108-story, 1,451-foot skyscraper in Chicago.The Willis Tower is thesecond-tallest building in the United States and the 14th-tallest in the world. More than one million people visit its observation deck each year, making it one of Chicago's most popular tourist destinations.

    The Willis Tower observation deck, called the Skydeck, opened on June 22, 1974. Located on the 103rd floor of the tower, it is 1,353 feet high and is one of the most famous tourist attractions in Chicago. They can see far over the plains of Illinois and across Lake Michigan to Indiana, Michigan and Wisconsin on a clear day. Elevators take tourists to the top in about 60 seconds, and allow tourists to feel the pressure change as they rise up. 

D 23
Chicago New York
Cost: ? USD
  • John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK)

    New York City hub offering flights from 80+ airlines, plus a variety of shops & eateries.

  • Times Square

    Known as "The Crossroads of the World" and "The Great White Way," Times Square is one of the world's most visited tourist attractions, drawing an estimated 50 million visitors annually. It is here that Good Morning America is broadcast live to the nation, here that the New Year's Eve ball is dropped.

    Many people come to Times Square for the ambiance and the billboards spectacle, but there are also many restaurants and shops - well over 100 - in the area including some crowd-pullers such as the Disney Store. Times Square is also best known for its entertainment, and plenty of visitors come here to attend a Broadway show.

  • Rockefeller Center

    Rockefeller Center is a complex of 19 commercial buildings covering 22 acres (89,000 m2) between 48th and 51st Streetsin New York City. Commissioned by the Rockefeller family, it is located in the center of Midtown Manhattan, spanning the area between Fifth Avenue and Sixth Avenue.It was the largest private building project ever undertaken in modern times. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1987.

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  • Statue of Liberty National Monument

    The Statue of Liberty National Monument is a United States national monument located in the U.S. states of New Jerseyand New York comprising Liberty Island and Ellis Island.It includes Liberty Enlightening the World, commonly known as the Statue of Liberty, situated on Liberty Island, and the former immigration station at Ellis Island which opened in 1892 and closed in 1954.

    This is New York in one sight. The iconic, majestic statue is an absolute must-see while visiting the city.

  • Battery Park

  • Charging Bull

  • Wall Street

  • Trinity Church

    Historic Episcopal church & cemetery where Alexander Hamilton & other early Americans are buried. 

  • 9/11 Memorial

    Plaza, pools & exhibits honoring victims of 1993 & 2001 WTC terrorist attacks. Free timed admission.

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Cost: ? USD
  • The White House

    The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States, located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C.Because of its exterior wall is white-painted Aquia Creek sandstone, thus its name. It has been the residence of every U.S. president since John Adams in 1800.

    The White House is divided into the Main Building and the East Wingand,West Wing. The Main Building has the library, the showroom of gold, silver and porcelain,inside collecting gifts of countries in the world.The East Wingand for tourists to visit, The West Wing houses the President's office (the Oval Office) and offices of his senior staff, with room for about 50 employees,outside is the Rose Garden and the South Lawn of the White House.
  • Washington Monument

  • United States Capitol

  • Smithsonian National Museum of American History

    The National Museum of American History: Kenneth E. Behring Center collects, preserves and displays the heritage of the United States in the areas of social, political, cultural, scientific and military history. Among the items on display is the original Star-Spangled Banner. The museum is part of the Smithsonian Institution and located on the National Mall at 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW in Washington, D.C.

  • Lincoln Memorial

    Many consider this to be the most inspiring monument in Washington, but that hasn't always been the case: early detractors thought it inappropriate that a president known for his humility should be honored with what some felt amounts to a grandiose Greek temple. The memorial was intended to be a symbol of national unity, but over time it has come to represent social justice and civil rights. Highlights Daniel Chester French's statue of the seated president gazes out over the Reflecting Pool. The 19-foot-high sculpture is made of 28 pieces of Georgia marble. The surrounding white Colorado-marble memorial was designed by Henry Bacon and completed in 1922. The 36 Doric columns represent the 36 states in the Union at the time of Lincoln's death; their names appear on the frieze above the columns. Over the frieze are the names of the 48 states in existence when the memorial was dedicated. Alaska and Hawaii are represented with an inscription on the terrace leading up to the memorial. At night the memorial is illuminated, creating a striking play of light and shadow across Lincoln's face. Two of Lincoln's great speeches—the second inaugural address and the Gettysburg Address—are carved on the north and south walls. Above each is a Jules Guerin mural: the south wall has an angel of truth freeing a slave; the unity of North and South is opposite. The memorial's powerful symbolism makes it a popular gathering place: in its shadow Americans marched for integrated schools in 1958, rallied for an end to the Vietnam War in 1967, and laid wreaths in a ceremony honoring the Iranian hostages in 1979. It may be best known, though, as the site of Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech. Tips The power of pennies? On the lower level of the memorial is a small museum financed with pennies collected by schoolchildren. Lincoln's face and hands look especially lifelike because they're based on castings done while he was president. Those who know sign language might recognize that the left hand is shaped like an A and the right like an L. It's unlikely this was intentional, but the sculptor, Daniel Chester French, did have a deaf son. Marchers flock to the Lincoln every year, drawing attention to various causes. Lincoln's famous Emancipation Proclamation, which set the stage for ending slavery, is occasionally on display at the National Archives (Constitution Avenue, between 7th and 9th streets). See where Lincoln was shot (on April 14, 1865) at Ford's Theatre (511 10th Street NW).