12 Days Tour In The East Triptoto
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  • Magic Kingdom Park

    Magic Kingdom Park is a theme park at the Walt Disney World Resort in Bay Lake, Florida. Owned and operated by The Walt Disney Company through its Parks and Resorts division, the park opened on October 1, 1971, as the first of four theme parks at the resort. 

    Magic Kingdom is divided into six themed "lands." It is designed like a wheel, with the hub in front of Cinderella Castle, pathways spoke out across the 107 acres of the park and lead to these six lands.The 3ft narrow gauge Walt Disney World Railroad circles the entire 1.5-mile perimeter of the park and makes stops at Main Street, U.S.A., Frontierland, and Fantasyland. One of the world's busiest steam-powered railroads, it transports 3.7 million passengers each year.

  • Bailong Elevator

    Bailong Sky Ladder is located in the Wulingyuan Scenic Area and connects the main attractions such as Jinbianxi, Yuanjiajie, and Tianzishan. It takes about 2 hours to climb the mountain from the vicinity of the Golden Whip Creek Grand Canyon to Yuanjiajie, and only 2 minutes if you take the Bailong Sky Ladder from the "Four Doors Surrounded by Water". There are three elevators in total, each made completely of transparent glass. Riding the elevators, passengers can even enjoy the view of the spiritual gatherings, composed of dozens of peaks on the other side.
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  • Kennedy Space Center

    The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is one of ten National Aeronautics and Space Administration field centers, and is NASA's Center of Excellence for launch and payload processing systems.KSC has been NASA's primary launch center of human spaceflight since December 1968. Launch operations for the Apollo, Skylab and Space Shuttle programs were carried out from Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39 and managed by KSC.

    There are about 700 facilities grouped across the center's 144,000 acres.There is a Visitor Complex open to the public on site.

    The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex has a variety of exhibits, artifacts, displays and attractions on the history and future of human and robotic spaceflight. The complex also includes the separate Apollo/Saturn V Center, north of the VAB and the United States Astronaut Hall of Fame, six miles west near Titusville.

  • SeaWorld Orlando

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Orlando Washington, D.C
Cost: ? USD
  • Orlando International Airport (MCO)

    International airport located about 6 miles from Downtown Orlando. It belongs to the busiest airports in the world.

  • The White House

    The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States, located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C.Because of its exterior wall is white-painted Aquia Creek sandstone, thus its name. It has been the residence of every U.S. president since John Adams in 1800.

    The White House is divided into the Main Building and the East Wingand,West Wing. The Main Building has the library, the showroom of gold, silver and porcelain,inside collecting gifts of countries in the world.The East Wingand for tourists to visit, The West Wing houses the President's office (the Oval Office) and offices of his senior staff, with room for about 50 employees,outside is the Rose Garden and the South Lawn of the White House.
  • Dulles International Airport (IAD)

    Airport serving the Washington D.C. area, with a main terminal designed by Eero Saarinen.

  • Washington Monument

  • Lincoln Memorial

    Many consider this to be the most inspiring monument in Washington, but that hasn't always been the case: early detractors thought it inappropriate that a president known for his humility should be honored with what some felt amounts to a grandiose Greek temple. The memorial was intended to be a symbol of national unity, but over time it has come to represent social justice and civil rights. Highlights Daniel Chester French's statue of the seated president gazes out over the Reflecting Pool. The 19-foot-high sculpture is made of 28 pieces of Georgia marble. The surrounding white Colorado-marble memorial was designed by Henry Bacon and completed in 1922. The 36 Doric columns represent the 36 states in the Union at the time of Lincoln's death; their names appear on the frieze above the columns. Over the frieze are the names of the 48 states in existence when the memorial was dedicated. Alaska and Hawaii are represented with an inscription on the terrace leading up to the memorial. At night the memorial is illuminated, creating a striking play of light and shadow across Lincoln's face. Two of Lincoln's great speeches—the second inaugural address and the Gettysburg Address—are carved on the north and south walls. Above each is a Jules Guerin mural: the south wall has an angel of truth freeing a slave; the unity of North and South is opposite. The memorial's powerful symbolism makes it a popular gathering place: in its shadow Americans marched for integrated schools in 1958, rallied for an end to the Vietnam War in 1967, and laid wreaths in a ceremony honoring the Iranian hostages in 1979. It may be best known, though, as the site of Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech. Tips The power of pennies? On the lower level of the memorial is a small museum financed with pennies collected by schoolchildren. Lincoln's face and hands look especially lifelike because they're based on castings done while he was president. Those who know sign language might recognize that the left hand is shaped like an A and the right like an L. It's unlikely this was intentional, but the sculptor, Daniel Chester French, did have a deaf son. Marchers flock to the Lincoln every year, drawing attention to various causes. Lincoln's famous Emancipation Proclamation, which set the stage for ending slavery, is occasionally on display at the National Archives (Constitution Avenue, between 7th and 9th streets). See where Lincoln was shot (on April 14, 1865) at Ford's Theatre (511 10th Street NW).
  • Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial

    The Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial is a presidential memorial in Washington D.C. dedicated to the memory of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, the 32nd President of the United States, and to the era he represents.
  • Thomas Jefferson Memorial

    The Thomas Jefferson Memorial is a presidential memorial in Washington, D.C., dedicated to Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826), one of the most important of the American Founding Fathers as the main drafter and writer of the Declaration of Independence, member of the Continental Congress, governor of the newly independent Commonwealth of Virginia, American minister to King Louis XVI and the Kingdom of France, first U.S. Secretary of State under the first President George Washington, the second Vice President of the United States under second President John Adams, and also the third President (1801–1809), as well as being the founder of the University of Virginia at Charlottesville, Virginia.

    The neoclassical Memorial building on the Tidal Basin off the Washington Channel of the Potomac River was designed by the architect John Russell Pope. Construction of the building began in 1939 and was completed in 1943. The bronze statue of Jefferson was added in 1947.

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  • United States Capitol

  • Library of Congress

  • Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum

    The National Air and Space Museum of the Smithsonian Institution, also called the NASM, is a museum in Washington, D.C.. It holds the largest collection of historic aircraft and spacecraft in the world. It was established in 1946 as the National Air Museum and opened its main building near L'Enfant Plaza in 1976. In 2014, the museum saw approximately 6.7 million visitors, making it the fifth most visited museum in the world.

    The National Air and Space Museum is a center for research into the history and science of aviation and spaceflight, as well as planetary science and terrestrial geology and geophysics. Almost all space and aircraft on display are originals or backups to the originals. It operates an annex, the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, at Dulles International Airport, which opened in 2003 and itself encompasses 760,000 square feet. The museum currently conducts restoration of its collection at the Paul E. Garber Preservation, Restoration, and Storage Facility in Suitland, Maryland, while steadily moving such restoration and archival activities into its Udvar-Hazy annex facilities as of 2014.

  • National Gallery of Art

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  • Smithsonian Castle

    The Smithsonian Institution Building, located near the National Mall in Washington, D.C.behind the National Museum of African Art and the Sackler Gallery, houses the Smithsonian Institution's administrative offices and information center. The building is constructed of Seneca red sandstone in the faux Norman style (a 12th-century combination of lateRomanesque and early Gothic motifs; built in the Gothic and Romanesque revival styles) and is nicknamed The Castle. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1965.

  • Smithsonian National Museum of American History

    The National Museum of American History: Kenneth E. Behring Center collects, preserves and displays the heritage of the United States in the areas of social, political, cultural, scientific and military history. Among the items on display is the original Star-Spangled Banner. The museum is part of the Smithsonian Institution and located on the National Mall at 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW in Washington, D.C.

  • Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History

    The National Museum of Natural History is a natural history museum administered by the Smithsonian Institution, located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.. With free admission and open doors 364 days a year, it is the third most visited museum in the world, the most visited natural history museum in the world, and the most visited museum (of any type) in North America.Opened in 1910, the museum on the National Mall was one of the first Smithsonian buildings constructed exclusively to hold the national collections and research facilities.The main building has an overall area of 1,320,000 square feet with 350,000 square feet of exhibition and public space and houses over 1,000 employees.

    The museum's collections total over 126 million specimens of plants, animals, fossils, minerals, rocks, meteorites, human remains, and human cultural artifacts. With 8 million visitors in 2013, it is the most visited of all of the Smithsonian museums and is also home to about 185 professional natural history scientists — the largest group of scientists dedicated to the study of natural and cultural history in the world.

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Washington, D.C New York
Cost: ? USD
  • Battery Park

  • Statue of Liberty National Monument

    The Statue of Liberty National Monument is a United States national monument located in the U.S. states of New Jerseyand New York comprising Liberty Island and Ellis Island.It includes Liberty Enlightening the World, commonly known as the Statue of Liberty, situated on Liberty Island, and the former immigration station at Ellis Island which opened in 1892 and closed in 1954.

    This is New York in one sight. The iconic, majestic statue is an absolute must-see while visiting the city.

  • Fifth Avenue

    Fifth Avenue is a major thoroughfare going through the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It stretches from West 143rd Street in Harlem to Washington Square North at Washington Square Parkin Greenwich Village. It is considered among the most expensive and best shopping streets in the world.

    The section of Fifth Avenue that crosses Midtown Manhattan, especially that between 49th Street and 60th Street, is lined with prestigious shops and is consistently ranked among the most expensive shopping streets in the world.The "most expensive street in the world" moniker changes depending on currency fluctuations and local economic conditions from year to year. For several years starting in the mid-1990s, the shopping district between 49th and 57th Streetswas ranked as having the world's most expensive retail spaces on a cost per square foot basis. In 2008, Forbes magazine ranked Fifth Avenue as being the most expensive street in the world. Some of the most coveted real estate on Fifth Avenue are the penthouses perched atop the buildings.

    The American Planning Association (APA) compiled a list of "2012 Great Places in America" and declared Fifth Avenue to be one of the greatest streets to visit in America. This historic street has many world-renowned museums, businesses and stores, parks, luxury apartments, and historical landmarks that are reminiscent of its history and vision for the future.

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  • Central park

    Central Park is an urban park in New York City located between the Upper West and Upper East Sides of Manhattan. It is the fifth-largest park in the city by area, covering 843 acres.
  • Metropolitan Museum of Art (Met)

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art, colloquially "the Met",is located in New York City and is the largest art museum in the United States, and is among the most visited art museums in the world.Its permanent collection contains over two million works, divided among seventeen curatorial departments. The main building, on the eastern edge of Central Park along Manhattan's Museum Mile, is by area one of the world's largest art galleries. A much smaller second location, The Cloisters at Fort Tryon Park in Upper Manhattan, contains an extensive collection of art, architecture, and artifacts from Medieval Europe.

    The permanent collection consists of works of art from classical antiquity and ancient Egypt, paintings and sculptures from nearly all the European masters, and an extensive collection of American and modern art. The Met maintains extensive holdings of African, Asian, Oceanian, Byzantine, Indian, and Islamic art.The museum is home to encyclopedic collections of musical instruments, costumes and accessories, as well as antique weapons and armor from around the world.Several notable interiors, ranging from first-century Rome through modern American design, are installed in its galleries.

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art was founded in 1870. The founders included businessmen and financiers, as well as leading artists and thinkers of the day, who wanted to open a museum to bring art and art education to the American people.

  • American Museum of Natural History

    The American Museum of Natural History (abbreviated as AMNH), located on the Upper West Side of Manhattan,is one of the largest museums in the world.The museum complex comprises 27 interconnected buildings housing 45 permanent exhibition halls, in addition to a planetarium and a library.The museum collections contain over 32 million specimens of plants, humans, animals, fossils, minerals, rocks, meteorites, and human cultural artifacts, of which only a small fraction can be displayed at any given time, and occupies 2,000,000 square feet. 

  • Central Park Zoo

    Set within Central Park, this small zoo features polar bears, sea lions, monkeys & a petting zoo. 

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  • United Nations Headquarters

    The United Nations building is the headquarters of the United Nations.It is located in the Turtle Bay neighborhood of Manhattan, on spacious grounds overlooking the East River. Its borders are First Avenue on the west, East 42nd Street to the south, East 48th Street on the north and the East River to the east.It has the Security Council, the Economic and Social Council and the United Nations Trusteeship Council.Visitors can buy stamps of the United Nations in the inner post office,and post
    It also has restaurants,shops sold goods around the world, and arts shops who's the arts donated by the member states;the rose garden in the building covers an area of 18 acres (72842.4 square meters), there can have a bird's eye view of the beautiful scenery of the east river.

     

  • Times Square

    Known as "The Crossroads of the World" and "The Great White Way," Times Square is one of the world's most visited tourist attractions, drawing an estimated 50 million visitors annually. It is here that Good Morning America is broadcast live to the nation, here that the New Year's Eve ball is dropped.

    Many people come to Times Square for the ambiance and the billboards spectacle, but there are also many restaurants and shops - well over 100 - in the area including some crowd-pullers such as the Disney Store. Times Square is also best known for its entertainment, and plenty of visitors come here to attend a Broadway show.

  • Empire State Building

    The famous skyscrapers in New York, Empire State Building was built in 1931, a total of 102 layers, now is the third highest skyscrapers in the United States.It is a great place to have a bird's eye view of New York, night sceneone is especially beautiful.On Valentine's day, Christmas day, Independence day, such as the traditional holiday in the United States, the color of the building at the top will transform.Beginning in 2001, the Empire State Building will light up the night full of Chinese characteristics of red, yellow colour in each year during the Spring Festival.

  • Rockefeller center

  • St. Patrick's Cathedral

    Towering Neo-Gothic church from 1879 with twin spires & storied history opposite Rockefeller Center. 

  • The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)

    The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) is an art museum located in Midtown Manhattan in New York City.

    MoMA has been important in developing and collecting modernist art, and is often identified as one of the largestand most influential museums of modern art in the world.MoMA's collection offers an overview of modern and contemporary art, including works of architecture and design, drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, prints,illustrated books and artist's books,film, and electronic media.

    The MoMA Library includes approximately 300,000 books and exhibition catalogs, over 1,000 periodical titles, and over 40,000 files of ephemera about individual artists and groups.The archives holds primary source material related to the history of modern and contemporary art.

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New York Boston
Cost: ? USD
  • Wall Street

  • New York Stock Exchange

    High-tech home of one of the world's leading financial markets; closed to visitors without permits.

  • Charging Bull

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  • Boston Common

  • Park Street Church

  • Massachusetts State House

  • King's Chapel

  • Old South Meeting House

    National Historic Landmark & original site of the Boston Tea Party, reenacted here each December 16. 

  • Old State House (Boston)

    The original seat of colonial government & later state capitol, today housing historical exhibits.

  • Boston Massacre Site

  • The Paul Revere House

    The Paul Revere House was the colonial home of American patriot Paul Revere during the time of the American Revolution.

  • Old North Church

  • Copp's Hill Burying Ground

    Part of the Freedom Trail and Boston's second oldest cemetery. Many notable burials can be found here and the grounds themselves are peaceful.

  • Bunker Hill Monument

    The Bunker Hill Monument was erected to commemorate the Battle of Bunker Hill, which was among the first major battles between British and Patriot forces in the American Revolutionary War, fought there June 17, 1775.

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  • Harvard University

    Harvard University is a private research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts (US) established in 1636. It's considered among the world's most prestigious universities.

    The University is organized into eleven separate academic units—ten faculties and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study—with campuses throughout the Boston metropolitan area: its 209-acre (85 ha) main campus is centered on Harvard Yard in Cambridge, approximately 3 miles (5 km) northwest of Boston; the business school and athletics facilities, including Harvard Stadium, are located across the Charles River in the Allston neighborhood of Boston and the medical, dental, and public health schools are in the Longwood Medical Area.Harvard's $37.6 billion financial endowment is the largest of any academic institution.

  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology

  • Boston Public Library

  • Faneuil Hall Marketplace

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  • Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

    The Museum of Fine Arts (or MFA) in Boston, Massachusetts, is the fourth largest museum in the United States. It contains more than 450,000 works of art, making it one of the most comprehensive collections in the Americas. With more than one million visitors a year, it is the 55th most-visited art museum in the world as of 2014.

    Founded in 1870, the museum moved to its current location in 1909. The museum is affiliated with Tufts University, and its sister museum, the Nagoya/Boston Museum of Fine Arts, in Nagoya, Japan.

    The Museum of Fine Arts holds one of the most comprehensive collections in the world,and possesses materials from a wide variety of art movements and cultures. The museum maintains one of the largest online databases in the world,with information on over 346,000 items from its collection, accompanied with digitized images.

  • Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

    The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum (ISGM) or Fenway Court, as the museum was known during Isabella Stewart Gardner's lifetime, is a museum in the Fenway-Kenmore neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts, located within walking distance of the Museum of Fine Arts (although the Museum of Fine Arts's Huntington Avenue location was constructed after Fenway Court) and near the Back Bay Fens. The museum houses an art collection of world importance, including significant examples of European, Asian, and American art, from paintings and sculpture to tapestries and decorative arts. In 1990, thirteen of the museum's works were stolen; the high-profile crime remains unsolved and the location of the artworks is still unknown.

    Today, the museum hosts exhibitions of historic and contemporary art, as well as concerts, lectures, family and community programs, and changing courtyard displays. In accordance with the will of Isabella Stewart Gardner, admittance is discounted to those wearing Boston Red Sox memorabilia, and is free to anyone named Isabella.

  • Boston Public Gardens

    The Public Garden, also known as Boston Public Garden, is a large park located in the heart of Boston, Massachusetts, adjacent to Boston Common.

  • New England Aquarium